When the master becomes the… spectator

A lot of teaching is about control. Or at least it seems so.

First of all you have to control student behaviours. Gone are the days where you can expect students to respect you or do as you’ve asked simply because you occupy an authoritarian position, today’s teachers are taught and re-taught behaviour management strategies throughout their degrees and their career.

Then there is the expectation that we are controllers of content, keepers of knowledge. This stereotype is one born out of traditional practice and perpetuated through years of ‘chalk and talk’.

There are a number of teaching strategies that are currently popular that involve giving up some of this control, an exercise which frightens some teachers both old and new/experienced and inexperienced. These methods include flipped learning, SOLE and PBL among others.

I’m about to walk this path. Again.

A few years back I was a lot more proactive in this space. A colleague and I pushed each other to continually provide students with authentic learning experiences. We ran TEDx events, we had students create film trailers that were commented on by professional film-makers, we published student creative writing, we collaborated with other schools, we entered students in competitions, we had students perform poetry to each other and also in a public forum; we went beyond the four walls of our classroom and the learning experiences were richer for it.

Unfortunately, the school climate changed and we lost our mojo.

So why am I back trying it again? Mostly it’s because I’m going on long service leave and will only have my students for two weeks. In trying to come up with something ‘cool’ that could be completed in this short time-frame I remembered the work of Bianca Hewes, who I used to follow closely on Twitter when I was more engaged in this space.

One of her blog posts was about a class coming together to collaboratively write a novella and I was considering following this line of thinking, scouring NaNoWriMo resources and the Write-a-book-in-a-day website, but we’ve already done creative writing recently and I didn’t want to drag the students through something. What I wanted, was for them to take control of their own learning.

So, I came up with this – https://goo.gl/SIH1sV

I’m not certain how it’s going to go.

The hardest part will not be behaviour management. I have a few strategies and tactics up my sleeve to monitor student progress. I’ll use exit tickets, planning and reflection documents, inside-outside circles, value lines, and other methods to measure their success. This will ensure their accountability. Beyond that, I’ll use the usual CMS strategies to keep the kids in check.

The hardest part will not be relinquishing my position as the custodian of knowledge. I don’t pretend to know everything anyway.

The hardest part will be keeping myself in check. Each time I’ve done something like this in the past I’ve gone a little stir crazy. It’s the same with supervising exams and tests. I will be there, providing duty of care, but for the most part I will just be holding myself back and trying not to intervene (or annoy).

Wish me luck.

 

 

The Think Behind the Ink: Part 3

The last time I wrote a “The Think Behind the Ink” piece I said it was probably going to be my last tattoo. It’s lucky I used the word ‘probably’ because I’ve gone and got another one.

 

This is almost definitely the last. Although, in saying that, I can’t help think of the old Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoon.

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I would have to come up with something highly significant in order to get inked again though so this is probably it.

 

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This is me; I’m a monkey.

 

Before I was born my mum always wanted a pet monkey and when I came into the world all (cherubic and) hairy, everyone joked that she got her wish. Add to that the fact that I was born in the year of the monkey and that I have always been an avid climber of random crap everywhere and you can see why I associate myself with that animal. ‘Monkey’ is also one of the nicknames we use for my son so we’re keeping the simian thing in the family.

 

Springing from this is a phoenix. The mythological fire-bird is a common symbol of renewal and rebirth. What I’ve done (more accurately, what I asked Emily to do) in the design of this one is make it look like the bird/fire is made out of ink. What I’m getting at is that, through my writing, I create and recreate myself on a regular basis. I’ve reinvented myself in real life too (but I think I’ve told that story already).

 

Until next time…